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Better Hearing Care

3375 Burns Road, Suite 106 | Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410 (across from the Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center)
(561) 624-7525

Welcome to Better Hearing Care in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida!

We are here to serve you and to provide you with the most up-to-date hearing aid technology available today! Basic digital hearing aids generally require the wearer to make some manual adjustments in certain listening environments such as turning a volume control up or down, or pushing a button to change listening programs. In contrast, a premium or more advanced hearing aid responds automatically to changes in the listener's environment, making changes based on the signals being detected by the hearing aid. The hearing aid wearer is not required to make any manual changes. As the level of the technology increases in hearing aids, so does the availability of advanced features.

Better Hearing Care provides the best in services related to hearing evaluation, rehabilitation, and prevention of hearing impairment.

                                 You're going to like what you hear!                

Scientists Test New Therapy for Hearing Loss

Approximately 25 percent of the United States population between ages 55 and 64 have some degree of hearing loss, according to the Mayo Clinic. About 2-3 of every 1,000 U.S. children are born with a detectable level of hearing loss, too.

There’s no single treatment or intervention that works for everyone, according to Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, though hearing aids, cochlear implants and assistive listening devices are commonly used to improve conditions.

But research recently approved for publication in the European Journal of Neuroscience reveals there may be a possible new therapy that can repair hearing.

Scientists at the University of Rochester Medical Center and Harvard Medical School’s Massachusetts Ear and Eye Infirmary tested a previous theory involving the epidermal growth factor (EGF), which is “responsible for activating support cells in the auditory organs of birds,” according to a news release about the study. “When triggered, these cells proliferate and foster the generation of new sensory hair cells.”

Most hearing loss occurs when either those sensory hair cells or auditory nerve cells are destroyed.

To test the theory, researchers investigated several methods to activate EGF signaling pathways, one of which involved using a virus to target ERBB2 receptors, found in cochlear support cells (or the inner ear).

Activating the ERBB2 pathway, they found, resulted in the generation of new cochlear support cells — and new sensory hair cells.

“The process of repairing hearing is a complex problem and requires a series of cellular events,” University of Rochester Medical Center researcher Patricia White said. “You have to regenerate sensory hair cells and these cells have to function properly and connect with the necessary network of neurons. This research demonstrates a signaling pathway that can be activated by different methods and could represent a new approach to cochlear regeneration and, ultimately, restoration of hearing.”

Authors also found evidence that activating the cochlea’s ERBB2 pathway may help sensory hair cells integrate with nerve cells. Cells in the cochlea help convert sound waves into neural signals, which are passed to the brain through the auditory nerve.

Article appeared on Atlanta Journal.